The Modern Definition Of College Readiness

The modern definition of learning, school, and college is an evolving mix of education and technology jargon. So what does that mean for high school students wondering about their college readiness? Simply put, it’s a whole new ballgame from just a single generation ago.

Cue the ‘back in my day…’ story here. I walked uphill in ten feet of snow both ways to get ready for college, etc.

Okay, so what is the modern interpretation of college readiness? It’s all about critical thinking, having real-world skills (cyber security, IT, web development, and design), as well as being able to have the study skills and time management abilities that will let you flourish in college.

So the big questions raised by the below infographic range from ‘how do we properly prepare students for college?’ to ‘are we failing our younger students right now and is it too late to fix their future plans?’

college readiness

Source: The Best Colleges

2 Comments

  1. Joe Beckmann

    January 14, 2013 at 9:23 am

    It’s ironic that, forty years after “The Hidden Curriculum” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hidden_Curriculum_%28book%29), your graphic should relegate real “college readiness” interpersonal skills to “Contextual Skills and Awareness.” The real barriers to college admissions and completion are cultural, not intellectual, and the metrics used to enforce those barriers – tests and “core knowledge” definitions, are framed by class more than by any of the real skills the “real world” requires. At least you do pay some respect to some of the key behavioral skills – academic and cognitive – but you might look (again) at the skills in the SCANS Report (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secretary%27s_Commission_on_Achieving_Necessary_Skills_%28SCANS%29) of the 1990′s to see the relevance of BOTH high school and college to real world success.

  2. Träsel

    January 25, 2013 at 8:29 am

    Of course, if someone graduates from high school with all those skills, it would be better to go find a job and have a successful career, instead of spending four years and $ 100,000 in college.