How Teachers Are Actually Using Technology In Their Classrooms

Earlier this year, a study was completed that aimed to understand how teachers use technology in their classrooms, and to identify some best practices for all to benefit from. As most of you well know, many teachers have to approach classroom technology from different angles. Some have to follow a specific set of rules from their school or district, including what devices and software to use. Some have great support from their school. Others have none at all, and if they want to integrate classroom technology, it is 100% up to them. But where ever you’re coming at it from, a few best practices can help a lot. 

The handy infographic below takes a look at some of the more important data points from that study. Do you agree or disagree with the main points of the graphic? How is your experience the same or different?Weigh in by leaving a comment below, mentioning @Edudemic on Twitter or leaving your thoughts on our Facebook page.

How Teachers Are Actually Using Technology In Their Classrooms

In this study, over 600  K-12 teachers were polled and asked 16 different questions about classroom technology.

  • 93% report that technology has had a positive effect on student engagement
  • 50% report not being adequately supported in using technology
  • 46% feel they lack the training needed to use technology with students effectively
  • 33% report a lack of visibility into whether or not their students are on task when using technology

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4 Comments

  1. Alan Ovens

    May 17, 2014 at 4:58 pm

    The link to the research doesn’t work and it seems strange to me that the actual citation for the study is not included. I am also unclear why, from all the current research being done, this study was chosen and discussed. It relies on anecdotal evidence from teachers and tends to provide emotive rather than detailed information about how teachers use technology in the classroom. This does not reflect the depth and complexity of learning we want from our students.

    • Katie Lepi

      May 17, 2014 at 5:39 pm

      Hi Alan,

      I think the ‘link’ you’re talking about is part of the graphic, thus not clickable. You can type it into your browser if you want to head to the site.

      • Alan Ovens

        May 18, 2014 at 4:39 am

        Hi Katie. No, I tried that. It takes me to a mail server that is no longer working. Let me know if it works for you though.

        • Amanda

          May 27, 2014 at 9:53 am

          Hi Alan,

          Thanks for your feedback – we at digedu actually just found out that our study was featured in this article. Thank you Edudemic for sharing our research!

          This infographic is simply a high-level list of some of our results. I think you’ll find the full report more interesting if you are looking for more depth and information.

          We would welcome any additional feedback you have — you can email us at connect@digedu.com.

          Thanks!