Report Uncovers Who Is Actually Teaching With Technology

Not too long ago, the Washington-based Pew Research Center published a report on how teachers are using technology at home and in their classrooms. As part of the Internet and American Life survey (which aims to gauge how Americans use technology and the internet as a part of their daily life.

The survey was conducted with middle and secondary instructors across the US, with a special focus on educators involved in the Advanced Placement and National Writing Project. Overall, the findings show that digital technologies have become a central part of teachers’ teaching and professional development. These technologies have also brought along a number of new challenges for teachers, which are detailed in the results below. If you’re interested, you can read the whole report here.

Teaching With Technology

  1. 92% of these teachers say the internet has a “major impact” on their ability to access content, resources, and materials for their teaching
  2. 69% say the internet has a “major impact” on their ability to share ideas with other teachers
  3. 67% say the internet has a “major impact” on their ability to interact with parents and 57% say it has had such an impact on enabling their interaction with students
  4. Educators tend to be more advanced technology users than the general adult population
  5. Educators are also more likely to own laptops, tablets, and e-readers than the general adult population
  6. They are also much more likely to use social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn
  7. 42% of teachers report that they still feel like their students know more about technology than they do
  8. Only 18% reported that they know more about technology than their students do
  9. Mobile technology has become central to the learning process, with 73% of AP and NWP teachers saying that they and/or their students use their cell phones in the classroom or to complete assignments
  10. More than four in ten teachers report the use of e-readers (45%) and tablet computers (43%) in their classrooms or to complete assignments
  11. 62% say their school does a “good job” supporting teachers’ efforts to bring digital tools into the learning process, and 68% say their school provides formal training in this area
  12. Teachers of low income students, however, are much less likely than teachers of the highest income students to use tablet computers (37% v. 56%) or e-readers (41% v. 55%) in their classrooms and assignments
  13. Similarly, just over half (52%) of teachers of upper and upper-middle income students say their students use cell phones to look up information in class, compared with 35% of teachers of the lowest income students
  14. Just 15% of AP and NWP teachers whose students are from upper income households say their school is “behind the curve” in effectively using digital tools in the learning process; 39% who teach students from low income households describe their school as “behind the curve”
  15. 70% of teachers of the highest income students say their school does a “good job” providing the resources needed to bring digital tools into the classroom; the same is true of 50% of teachers working in low income areas
  16. Teachers of the lowest income students are more than twice as likely as teachers of the highest income students (56% v. 21%) to say that students’ lack of access to digital technologies is a “major challenge” to incorporating more digital tools into their teaching

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