How To Become A Learning Teacher

Being a teacher isn’t always easy. Between the time spent actually teaching and the time spent preparing for it and giving extra help to students, there isn’t always a lot of time left over. Sometimes we spend so much time focusing on our students’ learning that we forget to focus on our own learning- which isn’t usually a focus for most teachers.

I stumbled across this handy infographic not too long ago and while it is focused on businesses and not teachers, many of the ideas they present hold true for educators, too. (Note: I’ve cut the infographic into smaller chunks here, but you can click on the link above to see the entire thing).

What Does It Mean To Be A Learning Teacher?

For learning teachers, it isn’t just about coming to work and teaching your students each day. Its about continuing to challenge yourself and continuing to learn throughout your career. For many teachers, their own learning process for teaching is relegated to whatever challenges you face each day in the classroom, along with a few professional development days scattered throughout the year. For learning teachers…

  • Information is always shared and accessible
  • Individuals are expected to learn constantly
  • Mistakes or failures are not punished, but seen as part of the learning process
  • Learning is emphasized and valued

 

Screen Shot 2013-09-30 at 2.51.54 PM

 

What Do Learning Teachers Do?

Learning teachers value learning as a part of their career, so they…

  • Participate in continuous learning programs to improve their teaching, broaden their knowledge base, and help make themselves and their colleagues more effective
  • Promote, facilitate, and reward collective learning
  • Integrate evaluation into all aspects of their learning programs

 

Screen Shot 2013-09-30 at 2.52.06 PM

 

Why Keep Learning?

It might seem a little silly to even ask that question, because why would you really want to stop learning anyway? Today’s infographic takes a look at 7 different benefits of maintaining a culture of learning as professionals.

  • Promotes innovation
  • Free flow of information
  • Everyone’s ideas and perspectives are appreciated
  • Allows the school to attract and retain the best teachers and staff
  • Improved social interaction and interpersonal skills in teachers and staff
  • Promotes a sense of ownership and appreciation among teachers and staff
  • Everyone is encouraged to improve their personal skills and qualities

 

Screen Shot 2013-09-30 at 2.52.56 PM

2 Comments

  1. smolson

    October 11, 2013 at 2:51 pm

    Your article is something that most of the teachers I work with need to read. Once many educators are out of college, have the degree or even have been in the profession a while, it is easy to forget that professional learning needs to take place. After years of end of the year surveys proved at our school, most teachers were not taking the time to read professionally. As an administrator, our school has been emphasizing professional reading to stay current in their area of teaching and have had to make it mandatory. I need the buy in to do so and I am hoping that this will help. I understand that life gets busy but it is hard to teach life long learning when we ourselves are not doing it.

  2. Mushtaq Rizvi

    October 21, 2013 at 1:48 pm

    I am a teacher and want to learn techniques of teaching.