The Teacher’s Guides To Technology And Learning

teacher's guides to technology and learning

Welcome to the official guide to technology and learning by Edudemic! This part of Edudemic is meant to offer you, the teacher, some of the best and most popular resources available today. We’ve combed through hundreds of resources in order to narrow down our guides into something easy to read, easy to use, and easy to share.

Below are links to the guides we have made so far. They’re always a work in progress so be sure to let us know if we missed something or if you have more resources you want us to call out in the guides. We’re always looking for the best and most useful resources so don’t be shy, share!

Just click on the title or image of each guide to view that particular resource. Enjoy!

twitterguide

The Teacher’s Guide To Twitter

Twitter has proven itself to be an indispensable tool for educators around the globe. Whatever skill level you may be, Twitter is downright fun and worth your time. So here’s a useful guide that we curated from Edudemic’s archives in an effort to put something together that was a bit easier to read than random blog posts. We hope you enjoy and will be regularly adding to this guide so feel free to leave your ideas down in the comments or by, what else, tweeting us @edudemic anytime!

guide to flipped classrooms

The Teacher’s Guide To Flipped Classrooms

We talk a lot about flipped classrooms on Edudemic. In fact, it’s by far one of our most sought-after topic in terms of questions on social media, search queries, and more. So we thought it would be useful to organize all of our many resources into one easy-to-use guide. That’s the teacher’s guide to flipped classrooms. It’s a curated list of all the most useful flipped classroom resources we’ve seen. We hope you find it interesting, useful, and want to lend your expertise to make it even better. Just leave a comment at the bottom of the page to share your flipped classroom resources with your fellow readers!

The Teacher’s Guide To Copyright And Fair Use

Today, so much of our research happens online, and part of what makes the internet so wonderful is the ease at which it brings information into our lives. But when that information is so easily available to us, it is sometimes easy to forget that someone else produced that information, and they deserve credit. Plagiarism is as much an issue now as it ever has been. Teaching students about copyright is more than just letting them know that they should be doing their own work, and not copying off the web.

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The Teacher’s Guide To Google Glass

If you’re as excited as Katie and me about Google Glass, this guide is for you. We like to take on the latest technology and see how it fits into education. If it doesn’t, we typically don’t write about it or will mention it in passing. But the potential for Google Glass in education is just too great. That’s why we thought it would be useful to compile an early-stages ‘Teacher’s Guide to Google Glass.’ Once the expensive pair of glasses actually makes it into the hands of a teacher, the typical lecture will become something totally different. In fact, much of the education process will be flipped as students will be able to view the world through the lens of a teacher (literally) and get a new perspective on learning.

badgesguide

The Teacher’s Guide To Badges In Education

What encourages students to do well in school? Often, it comes down to grades. Many students will work harder in order to earn a higher grade. Colleges want to see good grades. Parents want to see good grades. Grades are good, right? Of course they are, but the grades should not be the only goal. Learning for the sake of it should be a goal, including what they learned, how long they remembered it, and how they applied it to new situations.

Unfortunately, some students are not motivated by grades. Yes, this includes your brightest kids. Some kids could get an A on any test you give them, so they do not see the need for homework. Why do an hour of work every night when they know they are going to get an A on the test? Now you have a student who gets Fs on all his homework and As on all his tests. It turns into a C average, and he doesn’t care. How do you motivate him to do more or do better? The old-fashioned way – you give him a badge.

locguide

The Teacher’s Guide To The Library Of Congress

We’ve discussed the benefits of the U.S. Library of Congress many times on Edudemic. Usually we focus on some particular parts of the vast amount of resources or instead offer a more overall picture of what it offers. This time around, we thought you might enjoy an actual guide (written for teachers and education in general) that’s easy and a solid resource to refer back to as needed.

There’s no denying what an incredible resource teachers have in the Library of Congress. As the largest library in the world, it’s home to millions of books, recordings, photographs, and other materials, many of them original sources.

safeonlineguide

The Teacher’s Guide To Keeping Students Safe Online

Most students are familiar with and active users of mobile technology. While it does facilitate sharing and knowledge exchange, it can be a dangerous tool if improperly used. By this I mean students using their smartphones (or dumbphones, for that matter) to share things they would never normally share. From inappropriate comments to sexting, it’s a dangerous minefield.

digitalcontentguide

 The Teacher’s Guide To Choosing The Best Digital Content

A blended learning environment means you’re mixing technology with standard teaching practices in order to enhance education. In other words, you’re mixing a little bit of tech with a little bit of in-classroom learning and you’re getting something better than the sum of its parts. Blended learning is becoming the biggest trend in education technology lately as teachers (hey that’s you!) realize technology isn’t the magical unicorn of education. It’s not enough to simply throw an iPad into a student’s hands and walk away.

scavengerhunts

 The Teacher’s Guide To Digital Scavenger Hunts

If you’ve got a smartphone or a tablet in your classroom, you’re ready for the adventure to begin! By adventure I mean, of course, the world of active learning through digital scavenger hunts. In this hunt, students are tasked with finding a particular physical object, person, or place and have to use technology to track it down. Note: an ‘online scavenger hunt’ usually implies that you’re hunting around online and not physically with classmates. For the purpose of this article, I’m focusing on the physical version I’ve dubbed ‘digital scavenger hunts’.

pinterestguide

The Teacher’s Guide To Pinterest In The Classroom

Do you love to pin? Are you addicted to Pinterest? It’s okay if you are. You’re not alone. In fact, there are plenty of professors out there pinning right along with you. They’re using it to share quotes, lectures, notes, research material, get student or peer critiques, and more. What follows below is one of the most useful infographics I’ve seen on Pinterest’s role in education. And I’ve seen a lot. One of my favorite parts is toward the bottom where it lists out how exactly different universities are using Pinterest in the classroom (in the appropriately named ‘In The Classroom’ section).

More Guides Coming Soon!