13 Schools Offering Education & Teaching Degrees Online

Elementary School Teacher, Erica Eller Watch Her Story
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Studying Teaching

I’m interested in studying teaching. What can you tell me?

Teaching is a field for people who want to influence their communities in positive ways. Teachers are responsible for educating students aged 5 to 18 in a range of academic and social skills so that they are prepared to be productive adults by the time they finish high school.

People are often drawn to teaching because they enjoy interacting with children and teens. But teachers also must be confident leaders who can maintain control of their classrooms. In addition, they must be able to follow the curriculum standards set by their state. So if you want to teach, you should prepare yourself to spend many hours each week planning lessons and assessing your students’ work.

If you decide to pursue a teaching degree, you must meet several requirements. You must earn at least a bachelors degree in order to teach kindergarten through twelfth grade. In addition, you must complete a teaching program that is approved by your state in order to earn a teaching license. Finally, you must specialize in the particular subject area, or endorsement, that you want to teach.

Let’s hear some other perspectives

An Interview with Alycia Tanner

Alycia Tanner

Student, Bachelor of Education, University of Phoenix

“If you are considering studying education online, the best piece of advice I can offer is to make sure that you are prepared to work independently.”

Read the Full Interview >>

An Interview with Laura Brask

Laura Brask

Student, Bachelor of Arts in English Education, Illinois State University

“If you are interested in studying English education, I highly recommend that you visit the campuses of prospective schools and speak with the advisors there. A conversation with an advisor will help you to gauge the quality of the school’s English department and determine whether or not a bachelors degree in education is something you really want to pursue.”

Read the Full Interview >>

Teacher Overview

What exactly is a teacher?

Teachers are professional educators who help students aged 5 to 18 to grow in knowledge and social skills. They design class curriculums by creating structured lesson plans that teach specific academic skills. They also assess their students’ progress by grading assignments and exams. In addition to these responsibilities, teachers often coach sports or sponsor student clubs. Although the distinction between different levels of education is not always clear, teachers are generally classified according to the age of the students that they teach:

Elementary School Teachers

Elementary school teachers instruct students from kindergarten through fifth grade, or aged 5 to 11, by introducing basic academic subjects. They usually teach several subjects in a single classroom. Therefore, elementary school teachers often earn their teaching credentials through bachelors degree programs in elementary education instead of concentrating in a particular subject, like history, mathematics or biology.

Secondary School Teachers

Secondary school teachers work at the middle school and high school levels to teach students in the sixth through twelfth grades. Middle school teachers, who are sometimes referred to as junior high teachers, build on the skills that their students learned in elementary school and prepare them for high school. Their students are typically 12 to about 14 years of age. At the next level of education, high school teachers instruct 15- to 18-year-old students in a variety of subjects. Secondary school teachers usually earn a bachelors degree in the subject that they want to teach and earn teaching credentials through a state-approved teacher training program.

Let’s hear some other perspectives

An Interview with Laurie Davis

Laurie Davis

Kindergarten Teacher, Based in Meza

“I would tell a student interested in becoming a kindergarten teacher that the job requires a lot of work, but the kids make it worth the effort. Children have to absorb a lot of new concepts, and they struggle with some of them. But when you are able to witness the light that goes on in their heads when they get it, it is very rewarding.”

Read the Full Interview >>

An Interview with Kamarie Chapman

Kamarie Chapman

Professor of Theatre, Western Washington University

“Students who are interested in theater must be able to approach the field with a certain level of flexibility and adaptability, especially since you will work as part of a team when you become a professional.”

Read the Full Interview >>

Personality Quiz

How do I know if teaching would be a good fit for me?

Here is a quick quiz to help you decide if you have the personality it takes to succeed as a teacher. Rate, on a scale from 1 to 5, how well each of the following statements describes you.

I like to work with young people.

Teachers spend most of their time working with children. If you do not enjoy interacting with young people, you will not make a good teacher.

I communicate using clear and concrete ideas.

Teachers introduce new concepts to students. You will need to use simple terms and clear examples so that young students can understand you.

I model positive social interaction.

Students often view their teachers as role models. If you want to be a teacher, you should be prepared to be an example of appropriate behavior inside and outside of the classroom.

I am a leader who is comfortable being in charge.

Teachers are authority figures. You must be confident in your words and actions in order to receive respect from your students.

I can think in unconventional ways.

It takes creativity to write a curriculum that interests students. If you are enthusiastic about new ideas, you may enjoy designing lesson plans and projects.

I can keep track of many things at the same time.

Time management is essential to good teaching. You will need to carefully budget your time in order to manage many children, tasks and classes simultaneously.

I am patient and willing to wait for results.

Students usually do not fully comprehend complex topics the first time that they are introduced. If you want to be a teacher, you will need to patiently repeat the same idea many times until students understand.

I stay calm when I am challenged or confronted.

Students sometimes act out in class for attention. You will need to stay composed and collected when you discipline students.

I enjoy interacting with people from different backgrounds.

Classrooms contain students with diverse cultural, religious and economic backgrounds. As a teacher, you will need to be comfortable working with students whose way of life is different than yours.

I like to learn about new ideas and theories.

Teachers are required to take continuing education credits in order to keep their teaching licenses valid. If you cannot commit to lifelong learning, teaching is not the best career for you.

Get My Score

*Note that this is not a scientific quiz. The result is simply my rough estimate of how well I believe your personality matches that of a successful teacher.

By my assessment, a career in teaching is probably not a good fit for your personality. Please go to the Admissions Advisor homepage for a listing of other careers you may want to consider.

By my assessment, although a career in teaching may not be an ideal fit for your personality, if you are willing to adapt in a few areas, you can still find success in the field. Please see the list to the right for information on the areas that you may need to work on.

By my assessment, your personality is a good fit for a career in teaching. Scroll through our site to gain valuable insight into what it will take you to earn the necessary credentials.

Making the Right Choice

Is there anything else I should consider in deciding if teaching is the right choice for me?

Before you devote yourself to teaching, you should consider the licensing regulations of your state.

Teaching License and Endorsements

If you plan to teach in a public school, you will need to earn a teaching license and at least 1 teaching endorsement. The exact requirements for a teaching license vary by state, so you should research your state’s licensing procedures carefully. However, every state will require you to earn a bachelors degree and to complete a teaching program that includes a supervised student teaching practicum. You will also need to earn continuing education credits throughout your career to keep your teaching license valid.

In addition to your license, you must earn an endorsement, which specifies the subject that you are qualified to teach. If you want to teach elementary school, you need to earn a general elementary education endorsement. But if you want to teach secondary school, you need to earn a specialist endorsement, which means that you must choose a subject area to specialize in like mathematics, language arts or biology. Then you will have to pass at least 1 state exam that verifies your knowledge of your endorsement area.

Public Schools vs. Private Schools

Teachers mainly work in either public schools or private schools. The major teaching responsibilities are the same in either environment, but there are a few differences between the 2 workplaces that you should consider when you are deciding where to apply for a teaching job. For example, private schools charge tuition, so classes tend to be smaller than those in public schools. In addition, admission to private schools is selective, so students may be more motivated. However, many private schools are associated with certain religious values, so their administrators usually hire teachers who exhibit the same values. Finally, public school teachers tend to earn more money than private school teachers. And while public school teachers need to be licensed by the state, private school teachers do not.

Teaching Professions

What teaching professions can I choose from?

If you decide to pursue a career in education, you can teach at the elementary, middle and high school levels. Some of the teaching professions that you can choose from include:

Education Required:

Varies by state from high school diploma to associates (2 years)

Average Salary:

$22,200 (Lowest 10% earned less than $15,300; highest 10% earned more than $34,000)

Work Environment:

Childcare centers, elementary schools

Job Description:

Teacher assistants help preschool teachers and kindergarten teachers to instruct the class. They usually attend to non-academic duties like supervising free time and preparing and serving snacks. They also help manage students and escort them to classes that do not take place in the main classroom, like physical education and the library.

Education Required:

Bachelors (4 years); public schools require a teaching license

Average Salary:

$48,800 (Lowest 10% earned less than $31,700; highest 10% earned more than $76,500)

Work Environment:

Elementary schools

Job Description:

Kindergarten teachers use games and activities to introduce basic academic concepts like numbers, phonics and simple science to 5- to 6-year-old children. The curriculum that they teach helps students transition from preschool activities to more formal education. Kindergarten teachers may work part time or full time. They often receive help managing the classroom from an assistant teacher.

Education Required:

Bachelors (4 years); public schools require a teaching license

Average Salary:

$51,700 (Lowest 10% earned less than $34,400; highest 10% earned more than $80,100

Work Environment:

Elementary schools

Job Description:

Elementary school teachers are responsible for teaching many different subjects to first through fifth grade students. They plan and teach a curriculum that helps students to develop skills in literacy, arithmetic, science, social studies and computers. They also assess students’ work, lead parent conferences and perform additional school duties as needed, like supervising recess and lunchtime.

Education Required:

Bachelors (4 years); public schools require a teaching license

Average Salary:

$52,000 (Lowest 10% earned less than $35,000; highest 10% earned more than $81,000)

Work Environment:

Middle schools

Job Description:

Middle school teachers plan and teach lessons to sixth, seventh and eighth graders. Most middle school teachers specialize in teaching 1 or 2 subjects, including mathematics, history, language arts or elective classes like music and physical education. They grade students’ work, communicate with their parents and fulfill other school needs like overseeing the playground and cafeteria.

Education Required:

Bachelors (4 years); public schools require a teaching license

Average Salary:

$53,200 (Lowest 10% earned less than $35,000; highest 10% earned more than $83,200)

Work Environment:

High schools

Job Description:

High school teachers usually teach 1 or 2 specific subjects like geometry or literature to students in ninth through twelfth grade. They help high school students develop critical thinking skills by guiding them through independent work and group projects. In addition to teaching and grading, high school teachers often supervise extracurricular activities and contact parents about their child’s progress.

Education Required:

Bachelors (4 years); public schools require a teaching license

Average Salary:

$54,300 (Lowest 10% earned less than $36,300; highest 10% earned more than $80,100)

Work Environment:

Middle schools, high schools

Job Description:

Vocational teachers are responsible for delivering lessons about career and technical skills to students. Their teaching methods usually include a lot of hands-on instruction and labs where students can practice skills like welding or greenhouse management. Vocational teachers instruct students in classes like auto mechanics, computer repair and home economics.

Education Required:

Bachelors (4 years) or masters (2 – 3 years of graduate school); public and private schools require a teaching license and special education endorsement

Average Salary:

$54,810 (Lowest 10% earned less than $36,600; highest 10% earned more than $86,400)

Work Environment:

Elementary schools, middle schools, high schools

Job Description:

Special education teachers help students with a variety of learning disabilities to study and navigate the school system. They work with families and school staff to identify students’ specific learning disabilities, which may include physical and mental challenges as well as learning disabilities like ADHD and dyslexia. They use teaching methods like individual instruction, special accommodations and small group work to help students meet the unique learning goals that are listed in their Individualized Education Programs.

Job Outlook

What is the job outlook for teachers?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were about 3,476,200 elementary, middle and high school teachers employed in the United States in 2008. Overall employment for teachers is expected to grow by 13% through 2018, which is about as fast as the average growth for all occupations. Job prospects will be best for teachers who are willing to work for rural or inner city school districts or who teach mathematics, science and foreign languages, which are typically difficult positions to fill. In addition, vocational teachers should see about 9% growth and special education teachers are projected to experience 17% growth.

Education Requirements

How long would it take me to become a teacher?

It normally takes 4 to 5 years to become a teacher through the traditional route, which requires you to earn a bachelors degree and complete a state-approved teacher training program. Most teaching programs require students to complete supervised student teaching practicums of 1 to 2 semesters in order to be licensed.

However, many states also offer alternative routes to licensing, which are meant to entice people into teaching positions that are hard to fill, like advanced mathematics, physics and chemistry. Alternative routes allow people who have a bachelors degree in the field that they want to teach to work under a provisional license until they demonstrate effective teaching skills. These alternative programs typically take 1 to 2 years after earning a bachelors degree.

Areas of Study

What can I expect to learn while pursuing teaching?

As you pursue a degree in teaching, you will gain knowledge and skills that are unique to the subjects and the age group that you want to teach. But students in any teaching program will learn the following:

KNOWLEDGE

Curriculum Design

Curriculum design is the process of preparing the format, content and sequence of lessons. Courses in curriculum design discuss factors that teachers need to consider when planning lessons. Curriculum design will cover topics like how to set realistic goals for students, how to cover essential content on schedule, and how to use interesting learning materials and methods to add value to lessons.

Teaching Strategies

Teaching strategies are the methods of instruction that teachers use to present information. A variety of teaching strategies are used to help students who have different learning styles to understand course material. Some teaching strategies that educators frequently use include small group projects, lectures, class discussions and games.

Child Development

Child development refers to the way that children change as they grow into adolescents. Child development theories discuss how and when certain physical, emotional and intellectual changes should occur when children mature normally. In addition, child development covers the essential nutritional and environmental needs of healthy children.

Educational Psychology

Educational psychology studies how people learn and what factors motivate them to do so. It considers the different ways that students perceive, process and recall information. Modern educational psychology builds on the work of past researchers like John Dewey, Jean Piaget and Benjamin Bloom.

Instructional Technology

Instructional technology addresses the ways that teachers can use technology like computer software and the Internet to enhance student learning. Some common uses of instructional technology are the creation of blogs, PowerPoint presentations, online project collaboration and computer games that teach rote memorization skills like typing.

SKILLS

Classroom Management

Teachers of all age groups need strong classroom management skills in order to maintain control of their students and create a positive learning environment. Your teaching curriculum will help you to develop and implement age-appropriate strategies that promote the appropriate behavior of your students and constructively alter their negative behavior.

Time Management

Effective time management is essential for teachers. Your classes will teach you to run an organized classroom so that you can maximize your instruction time. Some time management strategies that you will learn include creating lessons that have clear introductions and closures, training students to follow routines during transition times and being prepared for every class.

Differentiated Instruction

Students learn in different ways and at inconsistent paces. As you progress through your teaching curriculum, you will develop the ability to alter lesson plans for your gifted or challenged students. You will learn how to modify parts of instruction like a lesson’s content, your teaching process, the assignment itself or the student’s environment in order to help students to succeed.

Communication

Your teaching program will give you the skills that you need to communicate with a variety of people. You will learn to take direction from administrators and to cooperate with other teachers. You will also be able to relate to your students and to actively listen to their parent’s concerns as you discuss their progress.

Leadership

A teaching degree will provide you with the skills that you need to become a leader in your classroom and your community. You will discover ways to motivate your students and you will learn to trust your own judgment when you make decisions about classroom management and instructional techniques.

Academic Degrees

What academic levels are available in the field of teaching?

Teachers most commonly choose to earn a bachelors degree, although you can earn teaching credentials at nearly every level of education. If you want to earn a teaching degree, your options include associates, bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees. You can also earn graduate certificates in certain areas of teaching.

Select the degree level you are interested in:

  • Certificate
  • Associate’s
  • Bachelor’s
  • Master’s
  • Doctorate

Certificate

You can earn graduate certificates in teaching, which state that you have received formal graduate training in a particular sub-field of education. Certificates are a good option for both elementary and secondary teachers who want to enhance their teaching credentials without pursuing a full masters degree program. But they are not the same as subject area endorsements, which require more intensive study. Graduate certificates are also very different from state-issued teaching licenses, which are sometimes called teaching certifications. A graduate certificate provides additional education to teachers but does not take the place of a state-issued teaching license or certification. Graduate certificates in teaching are available in many areas, including:

  • Educational Leadership, which introduces you to the theories and practice of school administration
  • Educational Technology, which prepares you to integrate technology and multimedia concepts in classroom instruction
  • Literacy and Reading Specialist, which trains you to use reading strategies and language arts skills to diagnose reading problems and to help children learn to read
  • Special Education, which teaches you how to help students with physical, mental or emotional disabilities to succeed in the classroom

What are the different types of certificates that I can earn in teaching?

You can only earn graduate certificates in specific concentrations in teaching. You cannot earn undergraduate certificates in teaching because you must earn a bachelors degree to teach in both public and private schools.

How long will I have to study to earn my certificate in teaching?

Graduate certificate programs in teaching generally require students to complete 12 to 18 credit hours of graduate-level study. Most students complete their graduate certificates in 6 months to a year.

What types of courses will I take while studying for my certificate in teaching?

The types of courses that you take to earn a graduate certificate in teaching depend on the specific certificate program that you choose to pursue. For example, if you choose to earn a certificate in special education, you will take classes about diagnosing learning disabilities, instructional methods for teaching children with special needs and ways to include those children in regular classroom instruction. On the other hand, if you choose to earn a certificate in educational technology, you will take courses in advanced computer applications, how to use multimedia in the classroom and how to design online learning environments. But there is no standard curriculum for graduate certificate programs, so the coursework that you are required to complete may vary slightly between programs.

What types of jobs can I hope to secure with a certificate in teaching?

Graduate certificates in teaching enhance your credentials and can help you stand out among other job candidates, but they do not qualify you for jobs outside of teaching. They are best used to fulfill your continuing education requirements or to pursue your personal interest in a specific area of teaching.

What are the requirements for admission to a graduate certificate program in teaching?

In order to be admitted into a graduate certificate program, you need to be a licensed teacher. That means you must hold a bachelors degree and a valid teaching license.

What about getting an online certificate in teaching?

Many professional educators choose to earn online teaching certificates in order to enhance their teaching credentials. A lot of graduate teaching certificates programs are mainly based in theory, so they do not require teachers to participate in hands-on activities. Therefore, there is no reason that experienced teachers should not earn their teaching certificates online. However, if you are earning your certificate with little classroom experience, it may not be a good idea to complete your teaching program online. New teachers benefit from working with experienced educators and practicing techniques in person. Finally, you should be careful not to confuse online teaching certificates with teaching licenses, which are issued by the state. You cannot earn teaching licenses online because they require extensive field experience.

Associates Degree

A few schools offer associates degrees in education, but these degrees will not qualify you to be a teacher. If you want to teach kindergarten through twelfth grade, you must earn a bachelors degree.

What are the different types of associates degrees that I can earn teaching?

Associate of Arts AA

An AA degree in education has more humanities classes that are designed to give you a broad education. This degree is a good option if you plan to transfer to a bachelors degree program.

Associate of Science AS

An AS degree in education has more mathematics and science classes, but it differs little from the AA degree. It is also a good choice if you plan to transfer to a bachelors degree program.

How long will I have to study to earn my associates degree in teaching?

Associates degrees in education generally require students to complete about 60 credit hours. Most students finish their associates degrees in 2 years.

What types of courses will I take while studying for my associates degree in teaching?

If you earn an associates degree in education, you will take introductory education classes that prepare you to transfer into a bachelors degree program. Some of those classes include human development, mathematics for elementary education and literacy development.

What types of jobs can I hope to secure with an associates degree in teaching?

You will not be able to get a teaching job in an elementary, middle or high school with an associates degree in education. However, in some states you can work at daycare centers, teach preschool or assist the lead teacher in an early elementary school classroom.

What about getting an online associates degree in teaching?

Some schools offer online associates degrees in teaching, although they more commonly called degrees in education. At the associates level, most of your education classes will be theoretical, so there are no significant drawbacks to attending an online teaching program. But keep in mind that an online associates degree in teaching will not prepare you to earn your teaching license. An online teaching associates degree is meant to prepare you to transfer into a bachelors degree program.

Bachelors Degree

A bachelors degree is required to earn a teaching license, so it is the most common route to teaching. However, there are a couple of educational paths at this level that will qualify you to take your state’s licensing exam. For example, you can earn a bachelors degree in education and specialize in an endorsement, or subject area, like mathematics of language arts. Or, you can earn a bachelors degree in the subject area that you want to teach and complete a state-approved teacher training program. Both options normally require you to complete a supervised student teaching practicum.

What are the different types of bachelors degrees that I can earn in teaching?

Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education BA

A BA in elementary education offers liberal arts courses in addition to methods for teaching children in kindergarten to about fifth grade. This degree is a good option if you want to teach elementary school.

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education BS

A BS in elementary education technically has more science and mathematics classes, but it is essentially the same as the BA. This degree is also a good choice if you want to teach kindergarten to about sixth grade.

Bachelor of Arts in Secondary Education BA

A BA degree in secondary education has more liberal arts classes and provides methods for teaching older students. This is a good choice if you want to teach humanities classes at the middle or high school level.

Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education BS

A BS degree in secondary education requires more technical classes and offers strategies to teach older students. This is the best option if you want to teach middle or high school mathematics and science classes.

How long will I have to study to earn my bachelors degree in teaching?

A bachelors degree in elementary education normally requires students to complete 120 to 130 credit hours, including a student teaching practicum of 1 to 2 semesters. Education students usually complete their bachelors degrees in 4 to 5 years.

What types of courses will I take while studying for my bachelors degree in teaching?

As you earn a bachelors degree in education, you will take classes that prepare you to run your own classroom. Some of the courses that you take will include lesson planning and assessment methods. You will also take courses about educational psychology, child development and classroom management. And if you are studying secondary education, you will take classes that are specific to the subject that you want to teach so that you will be an expert in that area.

What types of jobs can I hope to secure with a bachelors degree in teaching?

A bachelors degree on its own is not enough to qualify you for a public school teaching job, although it may qualify you to teach in a private school. The types of jobs that you will be qualified for with a bachelors degree in education depend on whether you pursue an elementary or a secondary teaching license. An elementary license qualifies you to teach kindergarten through fifth grade, while a secondary license qualifies you to teach seventh through twelfth grade. In addition, you can become licensed in a special subject, like art or music, for all grades. However, some states define their licenses differently. Because teaching regulations vary by state, you should carefully research the teaching license qualifications of the state where you want to teach so that you know what kind of license to earn.

What should I consider when deciding on a school to earn my bachelors degree in teaching?

You may want to consider accreditation when you are searching for a school to attend for your bachelors degree. The organization that accredits teaching programs is the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, which recognizes programs that adequately train teachers. It is not necessary to graduate from an accredited teaching program to earn your license. But if you do, you can be assured that you will be prepared to be a high quality professional educator.

What about getting an online bachelors degree in teaching?

There are no completely online teaching degrees that lead to licensure. However, many schools offer partially online bachelors teaching degrees, which are a viable option for some students. These programs allow you to learn the theory of teaching online, but you still have to complete field experiences and a student teaching practicum in a classroom. If you want to attend an online teaching program, you must make sure that it offers you the chance to work with students in person and put your theoretical knowledge to the test. In addition, you should look for an online teaching bachelors degree program that is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education so that you know you are getting a quality education.

Masters Degree

Masters degree programs in teaching and education have many purposes. Some masters degree programs allow students to earn endorsements in specific concentrations like special education or coaching. Some help professionals who are currently teaching to fulfill their continuing education credits. And they can also serve as your initial path to teacher licensing if you don’t have a background in education.

What are the different types of masters degrees that I can earn in teaching?

Master in Teaching MIT

A MIT degree has advanced classes about teaching theories and methods. It is sometimes called a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT). This degree is best if you want to earn your teaching license or your endorsement in a specific topic like special education.

Master of Education MEd

An MEd is not a teaching degree. It offers classes in broad areas of education like curriculum, administration and counseling. This is the best option if you are a practicing teacher who wants to become a principal or continue on to a doctoral degree.

How long will I have to study to earn my masters degree in teaching?

A masters degree in teaching or education requires students to complete 30 to 36 credit hours, which can take 1 to 2 years.

What types of courses will I take while studying for my masters degree in teaching?

If you decide to earn a masters degree in teaching, you will take a mix of theoretical classes and courses that are designed to help you develop specific skills. Some theoretical classes that you are likely to take include social justice issues, literacy and child development. You will also take classes about assessment methods and curriculum design. Prospective teachers will also be required to complete a supervised student teaching practicum.

What types of jobs can I hope to secure with a masters degree in teaching?

You do not need a masters degree to teach, but it will help you stand out among other job applicants and will qualify you for a raise. Depending on your masters concentration, some of the jobs that you may be qualified for include special education teacher, school administrator or school counselor.

What should I consider when deciding on a school to earn my masters degree in teaching?

If you are considering a masters degree in teaching, you should consider whether the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education accredits the program that you want to attend. Accreditation is not mandatory, but you can be sure that you are getting a top-quality education if you attend an accredited school. In addition, most people earn a masters degree in teaching or education so that they can earn endorsements in subjects like special education. But many schools do not offer programs in every endorsement, so you should make sure that the schools you apply to can provide you with the specialized education that you want.

What are the requirements for admission to a masters degree program in teaching?

All teaching schools require that masters degree applicants hold a bachelors degree, but it does not have to be in education. In addition, some programs require applicants to pass state teaching exams or hold current teaching licenses. Therefore, you should research the programs that you are interested in several months in advance in order to make sure that you have time to meet all of the admissions requirements.

What about getting an online masters degree in teaching?

Many people choose to earn online teaching masters degrees because they are able to complete their education without interrupting their careers. There are no major drawbacks to earning an online teaching degree if you currently hold a valid teaching license. But if you do not hold a teaching license and you want to become a teacher, you should only earn a partly online teaching masters degree through a blended program. In a partly online teaching program, you will learn the theory of education online, but you will also participate in a student teaching practicum in person. The practicum is important because most states will not issue you a teaching license until you have completed a student teaching practicum.

Doctorate

A doctorate is the highest degree that you can earn in the field of teaching and education. People who earn doctoral degrees usually teach and research at the university level or become school administrators.

What are the different types of doctorates that I can earn in teaching?

Doctor of Philosophy PhD

A PhD in teaching is designed to prepare students to be leaders in education. This option is best for people who want to become university faculty or school administrators.

Doctor of Education EdD

An EdD degree is not a teaching degree. It is the best option for students who want to pursue educational research at the doctorate level.

How long will I have to study to earn my doctorate in teaching?

Doctoral programs in teaching and education usually require students to complete about 90 credit hours. Students typically finish their degrees in 4 to 7 years.

What types of courses will I take while studying for my doctorate in teaching?

The exact courses that you take in your doctoral program will vary by school, but you will take classes that help you develop your research methods and your understanding of education policy. For example, you may take classes about policy analysis, comparative teaching methods and curriculum design. Most doctoral programs also require students to write a dissertation.

What types of jobs can I hope to secure with a doctorate in teaching?

A doctoral degree in teaching or education mainly prepares you to teach and research at the university level. You may also be qualified to be a school administrator.

What are the requirements for admission to a doctorate program in teaching?

Most schools require applicants to a PhD in teaching program to hold masters degrees. In addition, many schools will only admit students who have at least 3 years of professional teaching experience.

What about getting an online doctorate in teaching?

You should not earn an online teaching doctorate. PhDs require heavy research and you will not be able to work closely with faculty members through an online teaching program.

However, some schools offer blended, or partially online teaching PhDs, which may be a viable option. Partly online teaching programs let students learn the theory of teaching online. However, they require students to meet in person several weekends per year to collaborate with peers and faculty, so they still require commitment. If you decide to earn an online or partly online PhD in teaching, make sure that it is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education so that you know you are earning a degree that your peers will respect.

Licensing Information

What else should I keep in mind when considering studying teaching?

Individual State Requirements

All 50 states require teachers to earn a license, but the requirements for that license can vary considerably from state to state. You should research the requirements of your state carefully before you decide to become a teacher so that you are aware of the education, field experiences and exams that you need to take in order to be qualified to teach the age level and the subject area that you prefer.

Resources

What are some other resources that can help me learn more about pursuing a degree or certificate in teaching?

Association for Career and Technical Education

American Federation of Teachers

Bureau of Labor Statistics: Teachers—Kindergarten, Elementary, Middle, and Secondary

National Association for the Education of Young Children

National Board for Professional Teaching Standards

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education

National Center for Alternative Certification

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics

National Education Association

National Science Teachers Association

Teach.gov: Licensing and Certification Requirements

Teacher Education Accreditation Council

Meet our Expert
Heather Price
An educator for 20 years, Heather Price graduated from West Liberty University with a bachelor’s degree in education. She received her master’s degree in Teaching and Learning at Nova Southeastern University and since that time has remained on the cutting edge of educational trends. She has experience in almost every educational setting imaginable.

Online Teaching Degree Programs Directory

You have reached Edudemic’s teaching directory, a comprehensive resource specifically designed for students considering a career in teaching. From selecting a teaching program and finding scholarships to developing lesson plans and classroom management skills, we have all the information you need to pursue a successful teaching career.

Using the Directory

Explore the directory below to discover more than 2,900 teaching degree programs at over 700 schools around the country. The directory is designed to help you easily browse hundreds of different online and offline programs to find those that best match your needs and background.

Read on to learn more about becoming a teacher and the preparation you will need to do so.

Online Education Degree Programs Directory

You have reached Edudemic’s education directory, a comprehensive resource specifically designed for students considering a career in education. From selecting an education program to developing lesson plans and classroom management skills, we have all the information you need to pursue a successful education career.

Using the Directory

Explore the directory below to discover more than 31,000 education degree programs at over 2,200 schools around the country. The directory is designed to help you easily browse hundreds of different online and offline programs to find those that best match your needs and background.

Read on to learn more about becoming a educator and the preparation you will need to do so.

Scholarships directory

If you are pursuing a degree in education, start your scholarship search with this online directory, which allows you to sort scholarships by a wide range of criteria. If you are just beginning college and haven’t yet decided on a school, use the sorting tool to search by school or state to see which education scholarships are available in your area and at your preferred schools. You should also search by renewability if you are just starting college, in order to find scholarships that will pay for your traditional or online education program year after year, provided you continue to meet the requirements. If you have already started your education program, search by minimum GPA to find scholarships for which your current academic record qualifies. Whether you are in high school or already have college credits, you should filter scholarships by enrollment level and ethnicity. These functions let you find scholarships that apply to your current number of years completed and your ethnic heritage.

After using this directory, search for education scholarships online at the state and national levels to ensure you apply to all possible funding opportunities. Additionally, if you have already started an education career, contact your employer about sponsoring your further education studies.

See What Education Professionals Do

Education is the art and science of helping others learn. This is most frequently done in a classroom environment or similar situation where instruction is delivered to students directly, although it can include instructional support, assisting other teachers, maintaining archives and helping students and researchers find the proper information. In an education career, you will focus in a particular field. The most common field of education is primary and secondary school, for students from childhood to age 18. However, other specialties exist, such as adult education, educational support, and library and archive positions. A guide to the most popular careers in education and their requirements is found below.

Explore Popular Education Specializations

A guide to the most popular careers in education and their requirements is found below.

Primary and Secondary Education

This specialty covers teaching from toddlers to teens, with the specializations focused on preparing educators to meet the changing needs of maturing children.

Preschool teachers are usually the first introduction children have to a learning environment, and they have an opportunity to develop a child’s curiosity and love of learning from an early age. Preschool teachers provide basic education that prepares children between the ages of three and five for kindergarten. They teach concepts such as counting, colors, shapes, and some basic reading skills. They also supervise children during playtime activities as well as naptime and physical activities.

Work Environment:

Preschool teachers work in a variety of environments, not just at schools. For example, private day care services hire more than half of all preschool teachers employed. The rest are employed by nonprofit or community organizations and public school programs, such as Head Start. They typically work normal working hours between 9 a.m. and 3–5 p.m. and may have summers off, though there are also teaching opportunities for preschool teachers in summer programs.

Minimum Education:

In some states, preschool teachers are the only teachers who don’t need a bachelor’s degree, and may be able to work after earning an associate’s degree and an early childhood education certification. However, many states do require preschool teachers who want to work in public schools to have a bachelor’s degree in education or early childhood education, as well as state teaching certification. In addition, you may need certification as a Child Care Professional (CCP) from the National Early Childhood Program Accreditation to be hired as a preschool teacher.

Average Salary:

According to the BLS, the average annual salary for preschool teachers in 2010 was $25,700.

National Job Projection:

The projected job growth for 2010–2020 is 25%, which means an estimated 113,600 preschool teaching jobs will be added in that time.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Choose a career as a preschool teacher if you enjoy being around small children and teaching through methods such as storytelling and games. Much of the fulfillment of teaching at the preschool level comes from the use of imaginative play to educate children while also engaging them and developing their social and motor skills. You should also enjoy using arts and crafts to teach young children and should be comfortable helping them learn basic skills, such as hygiene and eating habits.

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers teach kindergarten through fifth grade. They are well-versed in a variety of subjects, including math, English, social studies, and sometimes art, music, or physical education. Elementary school teachers provide students with foundational knowledge of subjects they will study in depth in the future. In addition to passing along knowledge on particular subjects, elementary school teachers teach students how to socialize and work with peers and adults.

Work Environment:

Almost all kindergarten and elementary school teachers work in public or private elementary schools. They work during normal school hours, though their job often requires them to come in early or stay late to grade homework, meet with parents, or run after-school activities. In addition to teaching, elementary school teachers prepare students for standardized tests that are required in their state.

Minimum Education:

To become an elementary school teacher, in most states you need a bachelor’s degree in education or in early childhood development, though the latter is more appropriate for kindergarten teachers. Your bachelor’s degree should be from a state-approved teaching college or education department of a university, allowing you to be certified in your state after fulfilling the student teaching requirements and passing the certification exams. These regulations differ by state, and you can use a resource such as Teach.com’s map to find the specific requirements of your state.

Average Salary:

According to the BLS, the average salary for kindergarten and elementary school teachers was $51,380. Many public school teachers throughout the country belong to unions, which advocate for saving teaching jobs and increasing salaries. The two largest are the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) and the National Education Association (NEA).

National Job Projection:

The projected job growth from 2010 to 2020 is 17%, with an estimated addition of about 281,500 jobs to the existing 1.7 million.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Pursue a career as a kindergarten or elementary school teacher if you enjoy teaching small children, have strong communication skills, and are creative and able to convey information in a way that is both educational and engaging to keep the attention of young children. Successful kindergarten or elementary school teachers are patient, caring, and knowledgeable about a wide range of subjects.

Middle school teachers instruct children on the brink of adolescence, typically in sixth through eighth grades and ages 11 to 14. In addition to educating students on a particular subject, middle school teachers guide their students through the transition into adolescence and prepare them for high school.

Work Environment:

Most middle school teachers work during regular school hours in middle schools or junior high schools. They typically have a break for summer vacation, though some may conduct classes during summer school sessions. In addition, most middle school teachers stay after school to create lesson plans, grade homework or tests, tutor students, or run after-school clubs or other activities.

Minimum Education:

To become a middle school teacher, you need a bachelor’s degree, usually in the subject you plan to teach, such as math if you want to teach algebra or history if you want to teach social studies. In addition, you need certification from the state you will teach in, which means you have to complete a teacher education program, whether during your undergraduate education or through an alternate route teacher certification program. Many states require teachers to pass exams on teaching in general as well as on the subject they want to teach. In some middle schools, teachers can instruct students in music or art and usually require additional testing and advanced degrees in those fields.

Average Salary:

In 2010, the average annual middle school teacher salary was $51,960.

National Job Projection:

The BLS predicts that about 108,300 new middle school teaching jobs will be added between 2010 and 2020, which is 17% growth. Who should consider this career: Choose to teach at the middle school level if you want to teach preadolescent students the foundations of a subject and prepare them for further study. Middle school teachers should be well-versed in a variety of subjects and should be experts in the subjects they teach. You should also be patient and supportive in dealing with young teenagers.

High school teachers educate teenagers between the ages of 13 and 18, typically in ninth through twelfth grade. They typically instruct students in one subject, such as physics, geometry, or English, and prepare them for standardized state tests and Advanced Placement (AP) exams. Successful high school teachers prepare their students for life after high school, whether that means going to college or entering the job market, and teach them to be knowledgeable and responsible adults.

Work Environment:

High school teachers work in public and private high schools during regular school hours. In addition to teaching in the classroom, they meet with students, assign and grade homework and tests, and may be active members in parent-teacher organizations. They also stay after school to meet with parents, prepare students for SAT/ACT exams, and lead extracurricular groups such as sports teams and clubs.

Minimum Education:

To become a high school teacher, you need to have at least a bachelor’s degree, usually in the subject you will be teaching, though some high school teachers also have a master’s in education or an advanced degree in their subject. In addition, each state requires teachers to be certified, which means you will need experience as a student teacher and will have to pass exams, often on your subject as well as on teaching. If you are a specialized teacher such as a band or orchestra director, an art teacher, a coach, or if you want to teach AP classes, you will need a higher degree or additional certification in your specialization.

Average Salary:

According to the BLS, the average salary for high school teachers in 2010 was $53,230 per year.

National Job Projection:

The job growth outlook is slower than average, at 7% over the next decade, which translates to 71,900 additional high school teaching jobs. However, the growth rates vary widely by state and region, as do salaries.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Choose a career as a high school teacher if you want to specialize in a particular field and share your knowledge and passion for that subject with students at a more advanced level than in middle school. You should also be patient, yet able to establish rules and communicate them to teenagers. You should also be interested in providing guidance to students as they consider what college to attend and what major to pursue.

Educational Support

These careers focus on assisting teachers, either through giving direct classroom support, aiding special education students, or providing guidance to improve the effectiveness of teaching.

Projected National Job Growth:

20%

Average Salary:

$58,830/year

Entry Level Education:

Master’s degree, specializing in curriculum and instruction or a similar field. Most districts will also require you to have some experience with teaching, as well as a teacher’s certification or a license in educational administration.

Job Description:

As an instructional coordinator, you will oversee the curricula and teaching methods of a school or district. You will collect and analyze data on how students are learning and help teachers improve their teaching methods, as well as provide them with professional support and education.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Become an instructional coordinator if you want to improve the outcomes at an entire school or group. You will need to have excellent analytical and communication skills in order to learn how teachers can improve their teaching, and then help them to do so. You can expect to work a year-round schedule and meet with administrators and teachers before and after school hours, and make decisions with major implications for a district, such as deciding which texts students will use.

Projected National Job Growth:

15%

Average Salary:

$23,220/year

Entry Level Education:

Associate’s degree or two years of college. Some districts may allow you to become a teaching assistant with a high school diploma, but this is not common.

Job Description:

As a teaching assistant, you will help students review the material they have been taught to ensure they learn it, and provide general assistance to teachers. You will work with small groups or individuals, often assisting students with disabilities, as well as providing supervision when the teacher is otherwise occupied.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Become a teaching assistant if you want to help specific students learn all that they can. You will need a great deal of patience as well as strong communication and instructional skills, so you can determine where a student is having trouble and provide specialized help. You can expect to work an academic schedule, and part-time work is common.

Projected National Job Growth:

17%

Average Salary:

$53,220/year

Entry Level Education:

Bachelor’s degree, often focused on special education. In many states, you will need to pursue a master’s degree after obtaining your teacher’s certification.

Job Description:

As a special education teacher, you will work closely with students dealing with complex challenges and disabilities. You will help these students learn academic material and, where necessary, essential skills for living. You will also prepare individual educational plans and determine students’ progress in their studies.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Become a special education teacher in order to help children facing great challenges succeed and excel academically. You will need the patience and people skills of any other teacher, as well as strong creative and critical-thinking abilities in order to successfully teach students with learning or developmental disabilities and determine what methods of instruction will help them. You can expect to work an academic schedule much like conventional teachers, with grading and other preparation time outside of school hours balanced by regular breaks and vacations.

Adult Education

Adult education deals with students who are no longer of school age, but still seek to either make up for gaps in their conventional education or develop new skills and abilities from an adult perspective.

Projected National Job Growth:

17%

Average Salary:

$62,050/year

Entry Level Education:

Doctoral degree, focusing on the topic you intend to teach. You will also need some experience with teaching and conducting research in your field. Many colleges, however, will hire adjunct professors on a temporary basis with only a master’s degree.

Job Description:

As a professor, you will conduct classes in your field and supervise graduate students, as well as conduct research of your own. Details will vary depending on the field; for example, a biology professor will organize and supervise laboratories and the care of living creatures, while a French professor may translate medieval literature.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Become a professor if you have passion and talent for a specific academic subject that you wish to share with others. You will need strong skills in writing, communication, research and critical thinking to win a professor’s position. You can expect a very flexible schedule, balanced by a strong pressure to publish research work.

Projected National Job Growth:

15%

Average Salary:

$46,530/year

Entry Level Education:

Master’s degree with a strong focus on adult education. You may be required to hold a teaching certification and conduct course work focusing on your concentration of adult literacy, such as helping native speakers of foreign language acquire English fluency.

Job Description:

As an adult literacy teacher, you can expect to work in classroom settings and give one-on-one instruction, focusing on the specific task of helping adult learners become literate in English. You may have to emphasize a particular task, such as assisting adults trying to get their GEDs or English as a Second Language (ESL) learners.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Become an adult literacy teacher if you want to help adults get a new start in life. In addition to the communication and instructional skills any teacher needs, you will need to have patience and cultural sensitivity in order to work with students who may be embarrassed to be in such a class. You can expect to work in early-morning and evening courses, as most of your students will be employed.

Projected National Job Growth:

2%

Average Salary:

$53,920/year

Entry Level Education:

Bachelor’s degree, or a similar credential from a skilled trade institution, combined with education training and work experience. Some career instructors teach in high schools, which require a teaching certification as well.

Job Description:

As a career instructor, you will pass on your skills and experiences to students looking to enter a particular field. You can expect to conduct a great deal of practical exercises, along with classroom theory and study.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Become a career instructor if the idea of passing on your skills to a new generation appeals to you. You will do a large amount of practical work demonstrating the particulars of your careers skills. You may need a great deal of creativity in order to get across subtle but important details. You can expect to work a traditional academic schedule, with regular breaks balancing time required to prepare lessons and grade papers outside of class.

Library Science

Libraries are vital tools for research and education, and you can find work in helping maintain and organize them as a librarian, an archivist or an assistant.

Projected National Job Growth:

10%

Average Salary:

$26,330/year

Entry Level Education:

Associate’s degree, specializing in library systems. However, some smaller library systems may hire you with only some training or a high school diploma. Particular jobs may require related credentials. For instance, operating a bookmobile may require a commercial drivers’ license.

Job Description:

As a library assistant, you will manage a library’s collection of books as well as other resources, such as magazines and publically available computers. You will also help patrons of the library locate the resources they need.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Become a library assistant if you want to help students and the public without a lengthy period of education. You will need excellent customer service skills in order to quickly and effectively help patrons, as well as familiarity with how libraries organize material and use modern information technology. You can expect to work full or part time, often at unusual hours.

Projected National Job Growth:

7%

Average Salary:

$54,500/year

Entry Level Education:

Master’s degree, with additional requirements such as teaching certification or a degree in the library’s field, such as law or medicine. Licensing is done on a state-by-state basis.

Job Description:

As a librarian, you will organize collections and resources, supervise assistants and other librarians, and help the public find information they need by searching library resources or using systems like inter-library loan. Librarians also keep up to date with new publications, and take part in budgeting and deciding what books and other resources to obtain.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Become a librarian if you want to provide knowledge to the public or a particular organization. You will need to have excellent interpersonal, decision-making and learning skills in order to keep up with this rapidly changing field. You can expect to work varying hours depending on the nature of your library; public libraries often require evenings and weekends, while school libraries usually follow the academic schedule.

Projected National Job Growth:

12%

Average Salary:

$54,200/year

Entry Level Education:

Bachelor’s degree, although a graduate degree is often an advantage. Work experience through part-time, graduate assistant or volunteer work in libraries is also helpful. While not necessary, an examination for archivists with a master’s degree and work experience is offered by the Academy of Certified Archivists (ACA).

Job Description:

As an archivist, you will organize, restore and preserve permanent records and historically important documents, and help researchers make proper and safe use of these materials.

Who Should Consider This Career:

Become an archivist if you want to protect historically important information. You can expect to work a conventional schedule, and you may need to conduct research on how to preserve or interpret very old documents as well.

Apply to Jobs Using these Resources

The resources listed below will help you get your foot in the door with your first education job.

Professional Organizations

Professional organizations provide resources and networking opportunities, as well as hosting specialized job listings. Most have student rates, so consider joining a professional organization while you are still studying.

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages – ACTFL’s positions database has entries sortable by location, grade level, and language. You can also post your résumé for recruiters.

National Art Education Association – NAEA provides a site for art education positions, as well as giving you tools to search, post your résumé, and contact employers.

National Association for Music Education – NAMA maintains a database with advanced search options containing job openings in music education nationwide. It includes all specialties, from orchestra through band director.

National Association of Special Education Teachers – NASET offers its members a large database with search tools and résumé-posting options for nationwide openings in the special education field.

National Council for History Education – The NCHE job board is a new addition to the organization’s site, and is offered alongside many resources for professional development for history teachers.

National Council of Teachers of English – NCTE provides a regularly updated list of job openings for English teaching professionals, sorted by state and including adult literacy positions.

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics – The NCTM offers a job bank for math teachers and allows you to post your résumé online and create a custom search agent that will inform you of new postings.

National Science Teachers’ Association – This professional association gives science teachers and prospective employers tools to interact with each other, including posting résumés and searching open positions.

School District Websites

Many large cities operate central job search sites for finding new teaching talent.

Atlanta Public Schools – If you are interested in teaching and guiding Atlanta’s 45,000+ students, consult this site, with jobs updated regularly. Many positions are pool-based, and it may take some time for the APS to make a hiring decision.

Chicago Public Schools– Job openings from over six hundred schools throughout the greater Chicago area are collected here, ranging from K-12 teachers to librarians and specialist professions.

Clark County School District – The school district serving Las Vegas and the surrounding area offers positions for licensed and license-seeking teachers. You will need to contact their human resources department for more information on specific jobs.

Denver Public Schools – Locate a teaching or other position in Denver schools at this site. Be sure to double-check your application, as you cannot edit any job applications once submitted.

Detroit Public Schools – This site provides you with opportunities for teaching, internship and non-instructional education positions throughout the Detroit area. Be sure to have proper documentation ready for forwarding.

Houston Independent School District – This district-wide job site for HISD’s hundreds of schools provides numerous opportunities to make a difference in the lives of Houston’s 80% economically-disadvantaged student body.

Los Angeles Unified School District – Los Angeles’s school board operates several different job sites catering to certified teachers, both K-12 and adult-oriented, and library and administrative postings.

Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools – Check this site for opportunities to work in the schools of the greater Nashville area, from elementary to high school. The district offers extensive professional development as well.

New York City Department of Education – New York employs over 130,000 full time teachers and staff members. You can explore the opportunities at new and old schools alike at this central job clearinghouse.

The School District of Philadelphia – The eighth-largest in America, this reform-minded school district is always looking for more teachers and professionals to work to help close the achievement gap.

San Diego Unified School District – Find an appropriate posting at this bustling city’s school district and apply online. Be careful to read the application instructions thoroughly before submitting your application.

State Educational Job Resources

Many states collect job openings from smaller local districts and provide that information through online sites like these. Be sure to consult them if you prefer to work in a smaller school district.

EdJoin.org – This site recruits nationwide for teachers interested in working in California. At this writing, their greatest needs are for special education teachers and specialists in math and science.

NJSchoolJobs.com – New Jersey is filled with small school districts, and this site connects you with those positions, sorted by county. Articles on education in New Jersey make it an invaluable resource for New Jersey education professionals.

School Administration Association of New York – This site lets you sign up for job alerts throughout the state of New York and lets you post your résumé for administrators to examine.

Serving Schools – Provided by a private company, this site lets you search for educational jobs and teaching positions throughout the state of Maine.

Teach in Florida – Connecting educational professionals with jobs and recruiters throughout Florida, TeachInFlorida.com is powered by Teachers-Teachers.com. Registration is required, but there is no charge.

Teaching in PA – This site collects job openings from 450 school districts throughout Pennsylvania.

USREAP.net – The job search site for the Cooperating School Districts program provides job resources for Connecticut, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Texas, Iowa, Michigan, New Mexico and Pennsylvania.

Librarian and Archivist Jobs

Library and archivist work is essential to many branches of education, but is frequently listed separately on job boards. These sites will point you towards work in library science, but check the resources above for local districts’ specific needs, as well.

ALA Joblist – Apply online for jobs nationwide through the American Library Association’s collection of professional opportunities for librarians and archivists, including private and technical positions.

Archives Gig – Hosted on the blog site LiveJournal.com, this resource collects archivist job openings throughout America with a handy tag-sorting system to help you find the perfect posting.

ARCL – Greater New York Metropolitan Area Chapter – This online resource connects you with the New York area’s more specialized library positions. You’ll need your résumé prepared, as they only collect links.

I Need A Library Job – This is an extensive collection of direct links to jobs in the U.S. and Canada, combined with job tips and professional advice from other professionals.

Library Job Postings on the Internet – This site provides access to jobs in all manner of library and archival positions, sorted by region and including resources for international positions.

LISJobs.com – Run by a single individual, this site focuses on job openings for librarians as well as other educational information professionals.

SchoolSpring.Com – SchoolSpring collects library positions from schools and academic institutions throughout the nation and abroad. Apply online with their interactive features.

Society of American Archivists Online Career Center – The SAA collects archivist positions nationwide, from colleges to historical newspaper collections. Post your résumé or create an e-mail alert to keep you informed of new openings.

That Elusive Archives Job – This blog combines job leads and links with candid advice and discussion about the challenges of finding work in the archives field, making it an invaluable resource.

Private and Charter Schools

Private schools represent a significant portion of American educational institutions, along with modern charter schools aimed at changing the nature of modern education. Read these links closely, as different schools may have very different requirements than most public schools.

Careers at Connections Academy – This trailblazing “virtual K-12″ school group is always looking for talented professionals, but you must to be sure to fill out their forms completely for each position you apply for.

Charter School Jobs – Find a position in the fast-growing world of charter schools by joining this site at no cost, posting your résumé and searching for the job you want.

Christian Teaching Jobs – This site lets you post résumés and develop personal job search tools for a database of nationwide jobs in Christian education, not only for teachers but also staff members and administrators.

Council for American Private Education – CAPE collects resources and links to private education groups, including many religious denominations’ school systems, and to unique educational methods, such as Montessori and Waldorf.

National Association of Independent Schools – NAIS keeps a database of job openings at independent schools throughout the U.S. After uploading your résumé, be sure to set it as searchable so employers can seek you out.

National Catholic Educational Association – NCEA’s job bank lets you post your résumé and conduct searches for positions throughout the world of Catholic education in the U.S.. Be sure to read their instructions first.

Waldorf Job Openings – This is a one-stop resource for jobs at schools using the educational theories of Rudolf Steiner. You will need to contact the individual schools directly, so have documentation ready.

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