15 Popular EdTech Tools Being Used Around The World

During the past month, Katie and I have been working our tails off to make the upcoming September issue of the Edudemic Magazine for iPad (comes out tomorrow!) as helpful as possible to all teachers around the world. To do so, we spoke with teachers from, well, around the world.

During those conversations, we discussed an array of topics, trends, tools, and whatever else popped up.

One of the many things that struck me was that most of these admittedly ‘connected teachers’ use the same web tools and apps. I loved when I discovered this and wanted to share some of the most popular tools with you.Most of these were written down as side-notes jotted down during a frantic attempt to accurately capture what people were telling me on the phone. Couple that with dropped Skype calls and poor scheduling and it’s a miracle that I was able to get these 15 tools.

So without further ado, these following 15 tools (in no particular order) are apparently some of the most popular tools being used by the teachers I spoke with from around the world. Look for more information on what these teachers have to say in the September issue of Edudemic Magazine!

  1. Schoology: Through this social site, teachers can manage lessons, engage students, share content, and connect with other educators.
  2. Quora: While Quora is used for a wide range of purposes, it can be a great tool for educators. It can be used to connect with other professionals or to engage students in discussion after class.
  3. Ning: Ning allows anyone to create a personalized social network, which can be great for both teachers and students alike.
  4. Socrative: Available for computers, mobile devices, and tablets, this student response system engages students through games and exercises on any device they have on hand. Even better, teachers can easily assess student progress and track grades.
  5. Knewton: Adaptive learning has been a hot topic in recent months, and with Knewton it’s something that any teacher can access and use. The site personalizes online learning content for each student according to his or her needs.
  6. Google Docs: Through Google Docs, teachers can create and share documents, presentations, or spreadsheets with students and colleagues as well as give feedback on student-created projects.
  7. YouTube: Not all schools allow YouTube, but they are missing out as the site contains a wealth of great learning materials for the classroom. There’s even a special education-focused channel just for teachers and students.
  8. Dropbox: Easily store, share, and access any kind of data from anywhere with the easy-to-use and free Dropbox service.
  9. Evernote: Capture great ideas, photos, recordings, or just about anything else on your Evernote account, access it anywhere, and keep it organized. A must-have tool for lesson planning.
  10. Twitter: There are so many ways Twitter can be used in education. Teachers can connect with other educators, take part in chats, share their ideas, or even use it in the classroom to reach out to students.
  11. SlideShare: With SlideShare, you can upload your presentations, documents, and videos and share them with students and colleagues. Even better, you can take advantage of materials that other have uploaded as well.
  12. LiveBinders: Like a real-life three ring binder, this tech tool allows you to collect and organize resources. Much better than a binder, however, the site also comes with tools to connect and collaborate and a virtual whiteboard.
  13. OpenStudy:Encourage your students to work together to learn class material by using a social study site like OpenStudy.
  14. ePals: One of the coolest benefits of the Web is being able to connect with anyone, anywhere. ePals does just that, but focuses on students, helping them to learn languages and understand cultures different from their own.
  15. Edmodo: Teachers and students can take advantage of this great tech tool, as it offers a Facebook-like environment where classes can connect online.

2 Comments

  1. Katie Jones

    September 11, 2012 at 9:15 am

    These look like great, helpful sites.

  2. Caroline

    September 11, 2012 at 12:46 pm

    These are great sites. We’ve also been experimenting with Skype and Google Hangouts in classrooms, as well as Twitter chats/Tweetups and Tumblr. It’s a really neat way to connect people from around the world, or to specific people to speak on a topic to make it come alive.